Sometimes on the way to your dream,

you get lost and find a better one.

Friday, January 5, 2018

Wednesday's Words on a Friday

The original Words for Wednesday was begun by Delores and eventually taken over by a moveable feast of participants when Delores had computer troubles.

The aim of the words is to encourage us to write, a story, a poem, whatever comes to mind.
If you are posting an entry on your own blog, please let us know so we can come along and read it.

This month the words are supplied by Cindi and can be found here.

This week's words are:

1. resolution
2. niece
3. sweet
4. celebration
5. Elvis
6. golden

and/or:

1. snow
2. summer
3. typewriter
4. Edmund
5. sarcophagus
6. France

here is my very short story:

In a combined celebration of Christmas and New Year, the all girls dinner was going well.

Christmas gifts had been discussed, Jackie, a budding writer, had been overjoyed with a vintage typewriter, while Samantha had received a much wanted DVD set of Elvis Presley movies to add to her already impressively sized collection of all things Elvis.

Alice told us of her Uncle Edmund who had surprised his wife on their Golden anniversary with a trip to France. After a lifetime of white hot summer Christmases,  he wanted to experience a snow white Christmas.

My niece, Emma, newly eighteen and looking forward to her first glass of champagne, shyly told us of her new boyfriend, Daniel, who had brought her a sweet little teddy bear and a bunch of flowers.

Judy told us all about her husband's crazy wish to be buried in a sarcophagus like the Egyptian Pharoahs had been.
"A thousand years from now," she said, "people will dig him up and wonder what kind of Pharoah gets buried in a plain sarcophagus with no pyramid and no riches. He wants to stymie all the archaeologists of the future."

Talk of the future brought up the subject of the New Year's resolution and who was making one.
I quickly said I never made any, just hoped to get through the next year without too much stress.

25 comments:

  1. Girl talk - we females are an assorted bunch, aren't we?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sharon Qualls; a mixed assortment for sure. Nice to see you back here.

      Delete
  2. Love your story. And love Judy's husband's idea. Confusiong to the archaeologists (and indeed all experts) sounds like fun.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elephant's Child; I hope he remembers the mummification to preserve his body. I'd like to confound future archaeologists too.

      Delete
    2. fishducky; think you'll do it?

      Delete
  3. There is talk in Australia regarding the digging up the remains within graves after 100 years of occupation and removing them to 'Bone rooms'. How disgusting can that be . Australia has enough space to accommodate the worlds dead and more.
    Great story Elsie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Vest; I'm not sure it's so disgusting. After 100 years there is nothing left, no coffin, certainly no body, just bones that will be disrupted and moved by underground critters. Look in any old cemetery and see the collapsed graves where there is nothing to hold up the soil. If the bones are removed to rooms and properly labelled, they can still be visited. The other option is to rebury all of them way out in the middle of uninhabitable land, because the cities do need usable space for the increasing population to live in.

      The Happy Whisk; it is a OMG moment, but think about it again several decades from now.

      Delete
  4. You do so well with using the words River.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret-whiteangel; thank you :)

      Delete
  5. This seems so easy for you. I wish I had an imagination!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Val; thank you, I do find these easy. But I also believe your imagination is alive and well.

      Delete
  6. Great story. I like how you put it all together.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Happy Whisk; thank you, I based it on my own recent girls only Christmas/New Year dinner.

      Delete
  7. That's really short and interesting to read, well done. Best wishes!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Love how you weaved the words together in a fun holiday story. Think it would be fun to think of a way to confound future archaeologists? I might give that some thought.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Arkansas Patti; thank you. I think it would be tremendous fun. They'd be digging up all kinds of commonplace things setting a precedent for "normal living" in our time, then whammo! something entirely out of the ordinary gets unearthed.

      Delete
  9. Well done, River.

    They were a fun group of words to play around with, and play around with them we all did, it appears. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lee; it was a fun group of words. I liked your story too.

      Delete
  10. You always do well with stories always good to read.
    Merle............

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Merle; thank you, I'm glad you like them.

      Delete
  11. I've been having some trouble leaving comments; I'll try again as my computer seems to be behaving at the moment :)

    Well done with those words - you've really condensed a lot into a small space. And I've often wondered what archeologists will think of us in a few hundred years' time. I'm not sure there will be anyone around in thousands of years, unfortunately.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jenny_o; of course we'll be around in thousands of years, in one way or another. I'm wondering what future archaeologists will make of all our little throwaway bits of plastic like bread tags and twistie ties. Perhaps we should bury a loaf of bread, complete with bag and tag and a garbage bag sealed with a twistie tie in a time capsule, for them to find.

      Delete